Author Topic: Research Equipment  (Read 24097 times)

Offline skinwalker

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Re: Research Equipment
« Reply #15 on: April 29, 2012, 12:00:26 AM »
expedition starts in June I believe.  Tony has all the specifics.

Offline skinwalker

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Re: Research Equipment
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2012, 04:51:31 AM »
here is a link to more equiptment.  Any thoughts on any of these?  

http://www.nyshadowchasers.com/blog/2012/6/14/the-best-night-vision-camcorders.html

looking for a really good night vision camera this year.  either going thermal or gen 3 night vis.

astroscope adapters
http://www.electrophysics.com/Browse/Brw_ProductLineCategory.asp?CategoryID=166&Area=NV

http://www.nightvisioncameras.com/nv-products.html
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 11:23:05 PM by skinwalker »

Offline lucycandy

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Re: Research Equipment
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2013, 07:24:43 AM »
I'll carry trail cams and other outdoors equipment if I'm staying in the bush.  On the other hand, a trail cam's not a lot of good if you're hoping to catch ufos or orbs in the sky.








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Offline tronus

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Re: Research Equipment
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2013, 11:36:08 AM »
In my field studies, I use have used a variety of tools. I quickly learned that cameras make for bad instruments generating crappy data and revealing almost nothing of value, aside from at best grainy, low resolution out-of-focus blobs of light, if the objects decide to turn their 'lights' on that is. While the dark objects, those that don't radiate visible or infra-red energy, go unnoticed, often undetected, zipping about often right inside the 'camp'.  However, good tools are pricey and they are generally delicate too. In any case, here are a few of the tools that I use in my field studies:

So, now that I've pretty much drilled cameras describing my general disdain of their usefulness for ET field work, I'll show you my cameras that I use. I had other digital cameras over the years, but I used/hacked them up for experiments.  One nice one was Canon A5Z SureShot, I've still got it, but it has wires hanging out of it, and another digital was Kodak KD910. I used both of them in two axis cartesian photo-orb experiment platform that I hacked together with a linux pc & a parallel port.

Here's a photo of my Canon EOS-30D coupled with a catadioptic lens (a 2000mm telescope) that I bought on eBay for $400. I 'doctored' the photo so that its easy to see the black camera body with the black lens. The two peices together are heavy, almost 15 lbs. I use a sturdy metal tube tripod.  With my camera set to RAW and ISO3000, I can shoot really crappy blurry photos at about 1/4 mile distance at night. Durring daylight, I've gotten some fairly good closeups of discs especially over lakes.  The Chinese catadioptic is not a very good lens, it exhibits non-linear spherical abberations, but I can live with that.  I've been surprised to find that some of the things that I could swear were phenomena at the time, in the final analysis, turned out to be aircraft, or bugs...terrestrial type stuff.  So cameras can have value, but for the most part, not too useful, but are still fun!!  We are visual beings...



Here's the other camera I use. I like this one due to its extremely low light (0.4 lux) sensitivity providing good imaging in the dark (with ultrasonic image stabilization) and its HD too.


It was a fairly expensive camera for my tastes, and now its a little dated but it remains a very capable imager.  I traded a Yamaha 650 motorcycle, it was a good trade.

For checking for ionizing radiation, I take both a CDV-700, an old reliable beater Geiger-counter


which I intend for high-range measurements (no circumstance, to date, has presented that warranted usage of the tool, but I carry it anyway, just in case), while the second Geiger-counter, (its a crappy photo), is a quality survey instrument, a Ludlum 3A (I bi-yearly calibrate it), 


here's a shot of the thin mica window (enables alpha, beta particle and gamma ray detection) probe which I use with my Ludlum 3A Geiger-counter


The Ludlum is an excellent instrument. I won it on an eBay auction for around $350, the probe that it had wasn't very sensitive, only useful for gamma emissions.  Later I won the Ludlum 44-7 probe in another eBay auction, as I recall, it was around $250.    I modified the Ludlum instrument by sticking a Dallas time-date-chip & an Atmel ATmega32 microprocessor (uP) with 10bit A/D converter, (on a little perfboard with a 5 Vdc boost regulator), so that when I flip the audio switch on, the A/D takes samples, storing them into a microflash-card with sample + time/date. The time-stamp isn't super accurate, but good enough.  I unplug the uFlash card to read it via an adapter on my laptop. (You'd think that the instrument makers would offer these type feature?)  Only during one investigation did I measure any substantial ionizing radiation. It was emitted by a luminous-orb that hovered nearby a tree, so much so that the tree bark glowed for a short period and it was nuclear-hot, but it too dissipated. But I got the data and I didn't have to do any writing!!

Here's one of my main tools, as its been useful in virtually every field event. I discovered this tool while studying ghost-hunting tools. I wanted to know what they use, as I suspect many 'ghost' phenomena are likely misidentified ET phenomena and vice versa?  I bought this tool from www.mouser.com, I think it was around $80, as I recall.


I use this particular tool as its reliable, reasonably accurate and fairly inexpensive.  IR pyrometers, are very useful.  Certain ET objects absorb energy, and when invisible, the temperature differential can be used as the 'detection' signature, once one has taken enough measurements in an environment to establish the ambient baseline.  I also use the IR pyrometer indoors to track the movement of dark/invisible luminous-orbs (not-to-be confused with photo-orbs, which most clueless 'investigators' believe are simply out-of-focus dust-motes, because some 'expert' told them so.). Here is where digital cameras are useful, follow the cold trail, take photos, you'll find a photo-orb in EVERY photo taken, exactly where the temp-differential is located!!!!  I'd like to see the 'experts' explain that away.

Here's another tool I 'borrowed' from the ghost-hunters, its a bit over rated considering what's inside and has no authentic calibration, but it works, sort-of.  They're called 'tri-field meters'. Ellen Crystal and Barbara Lamb (attended my '11:11 parties' back in 1998~2001), report that they find these useful for detecting the presence of dark luminous-orbs moving about inside the area of crop-circles. I've been successful in detecting luminous-orbs with them, but frankly, it only seemed to detect objects a few feet distance from the meter, while other tools (much more costly) are more as useful, and have the ability to log magnitudes which are useful for determining object motion tracks and other phenomena features.

Here's a photo of the Ramsey TFM3, some folks I know call it the "K3" (in anycase, I gave mine away), I should have reverse-engineered it first...hind-sight is 20-20. Internally, it looked a bit similar to George Lawrence's original tri-field electrostatic meter, which he designed and posted in the 1963 Janurary edition of "Electronics World" monthly periodical magazine, having be hacked using 'modern' pretty LEDs for a 'digital' display.  They all work about the same in any case.



Here's one distributor who sells all sorts of similar tools, I have not tested any of this stuff, aside from the Ramsey TFM3.  I don't mean to imply its a bad tool, they just don't produce the  quality of data that I require:  http://www.lessemf.com/ghost.html

The tool the I prefer to use in lieu of tri-field type meters, are magnetometers. I've constructed a number of these gadgets, the most recent design, I'm still working on.  One of the simplest I've made was comprised of a magnetic compass, a reed-relay coil (reed removed), a nail and a simple opamp feedback circuit. Calibration was a bitch though, but it was fairly sensitive, but I did not exploit it, it was too sketchy. Another unit I constructed was comprised of a an FGM-3 sensor (www.speakesensors.com/PDF/detail.pdf). These are fluxgate devices that were originally designed by Dr. Noble and licensed to Speak Sensors, who miniaturized them. I hooked mine up in a 3-axis arraingement and I used a PC for the software math calculations. It was a good configuration but it exhibited a nasty temperature drift which affected calibration. I eventually figured out how to auto-compensate it.  My next design involved some Honeywell devices, namely the HMC100x/200x Anisotropic MagnetoResistive (AMR) sensors.
(http://www51.honeywell.com/aero/common/documents/myaerospacecatalog-documents/Missiles-Munitions/HMC_1001-1002-1021-1022_Data_Sheet.pdf). While not particularly expensive to fabricate a functional configuration, the problem with these sensors are the complexity of the glue circuits and difficulty of designing the printed-circuit-boards (currents generate EMF) and worse, they are US Export ITAR controlled devices, so I can't share the design with colleagues in other countries.  But the configuration works really splendidly and its really small too. I've got it up in a tree, powered by a little 5Watt solar-voltaic panel. Inside the sensor suite, I've got a solid-state gamma ray detector (no high-voltage or transformer EMF to blind the magnetometer), a temp/relative humidity/barometer, an optical anemometer sensor and a three axis AMR magnetometer. Its a slick ET object detector. I telemeter the data down to my laptop using an ISM band low power +8 dBm transciever. The interface is a USB 2.0 port (FTDI chipset) into my laptop.
The design I'm working on now, well its really inexpensive, easy to calibrate and super easy to implement. But I haven't constructed it yet.   

Another instrument which is useful, is the ion-mill, it is used to measure atmospheric electricity, as ET objects glow, via ionizing the surrounding atmosphere, the objects impart electricity into the ambient environment, which creates a detectable signature. However, this instrument is extremely expensive unless one constructs it themselves. 
I've constructed several of these gadgets, ET don't like them.

And finally, here is one tool that has dropped significantly in price, compared with the instrument that was loaned to me. That instrument cost about the same as the average home these days, depending on options, starting around $175,000. Here's an inexpensive version of that tool:



See: http://www.saelig.com/MFR00138/TSTEQSA008.htm

The above is a Chinese manufactured instrument, jacked up about $2k more than the import price, but its still a very good price, considering the western prices for these type instruments.

The instrument that I was using in the field (the loaner) was an Agilent E4448A.



It is a very good tool, there is little comparison between the Agilent 'loaner' and the $5k Chinese Atten unit. 

I plugged an RS271 cable into the front-panel RF input jack, routed the cable to a four-way RF position addressable switch, from which I ran four different antennas. I did not use a preamp, as the distance to the antennas were fairly short, and plus I did not desire to introduce any additional noise or phase-noise into the measurements. Since the Agilent is a smart tool, it also incorporates a fairly large flash storage space and facilities for data-logging, in addition to providing a USB interface. Using a homebrew GPS receiver that I hacked together, I ported (via an ATmega32U4 microprocessor), selected NMEA messages, such as altitude, azimuth, lat/long, UTC time, DOPs, etc.  I used four different antennas for different RF spectra, but I tried to overlap as best I could, without losing any of the span.  In anycase, I was able to monitor from the low kHz all the way up to around 47 gHz.   Luminous-Orbs radiate the largest spectra, especially when they are reddish-orange in color. The higher the energy, the less they seem to radiate, which is somewhat curious?  All the cameras failed, yet none of the other equipment failed to operate properly. I suspect the reason, is that I specifically did not disclose to the others in my group the purpose of my monitoring equipment or how it functions. I now suspect with reliable certainty, that Humans 'leak' information to ET telepathically.

So that sums up my research tools.  I'm developing a smart signature detector. I've been working on it now close to 15 years, one of these days I'll get it running, then the fun will begin. ET'll probably kill me then, they damn near did so the last.

tronus
ET investigator





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